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Prepare for your health analytics implementation before you buy a thing!

Avoid buyer’s remorse.

Did you ever have a home improvement project that finished late and cost more than you expected? How about a technology implementation that finished late and cost more?

You are more likely to be on-time and on-budget if your plan is thoughtful and reflects your reality. Don’t you want to have confidence knowing what you’re really getting into?

So, here are three tips to set you up for implementation success when it comes to health analytics:

  1. One-size does not fit all. It’s unlikely your implementation is the same as other organizations.  Why?  Because the culture of your organization is a huge factor.  Dig in.  What are the details behind YOUR implementation plan?
Tip!



Discuss what will be problematic or painful based on your experience and what you are moving away from. Are those complexities appropriately addressed, cared for, or resourced? Think about metric definitions and consensus, data quality, data reconciliation, matching and integration across sources, and slowly changing history.
  1. Understand what is and is not in your control. If something is beyond your direct control, is there a named resource and escalation path?  What risk does that pose to the project timeline based its nature.  For instance, your health analytics implementation is reliant on data from others.  How are your relationships and service level agreements with those partners and vendors?  How does that affect your plan and what’ the back-up plan?
Tip!

Before your implementation starts, refresh your knowledge of the day-to-day contacts, authorities, and any contractual SLA’s you have in place. If there will be costs associated with establishing new feeds or data interfaces, identify those early.
  1. Top down, bottom up, or an interesting mix? Think about the approach that will work better for your organization.  What process works for you – here’s my data – what can I do with it?  Or here are my objectives – what data do I need?  There are pros and cons to each but thinking about this as you prioritize is invaluable for setting internal expectations and getting the right resources lined up.
Tip!

Use phase 1 for quick wins. Standard sources generally seamlessly populate the most common views. Users feel like they get a lot out of the gate and that helps tremendously with adoption.

Remember, you’re better off with an implementation plan that’s realistic rather than one that sounds like a dream but doesn’t work well for you in the end.